LIME BLOG


Chart Interpretation.

Many musical acts on board a ship -- from piano bar entertainers to party bands to cocktail pianists -- learn the songs that make up their respective repertoires either purely by ear, or with written music that they have time to look at and study beforehand. Orchestra musicians bear the unique responsibility of having to sight-read all of their music upon their arrival to a new ship, and the music they read varies greatly in terms of content.

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Crew Bar.

As musicians aboard a cruise ship, the vast majority of working hours will be spent at night, entertaining guests before dinner, after dinner, before comedian shows, after comedian shows, in between losing efforts at the casino, and so on. And after the last set is finished, a musician's options (or any crew member's options, for that matter) are, generally speaking, one of the following: relaxation (back in one's own cabin); partying (heading back up to guest areas for the dance club), eating (late-night food served in the crew mess), or socializing in an environment more exciting than a solitary cabin but less wild than a party. .

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Free Time.

Arguably the greatest positive aspect of working on a ship as a musician is time. That might seem like a strange assertion, given other positives like new countries to explore, beautiful beaches to visit, new and interesting people to meet, and the sheer privilege of playing music each and every day.

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Keys Patches.

At first glance, the terms 'pianist' and 'keyboardist' appear to be virtually identical. True to form, most people use the two interchangeably when describing someone who plays an instrument with black and white keys, regardless of whether the instrument itself is acoustic or electric.

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Music-Sharing.

It is impossible to work a contract aboard a cruise ship and not be exposed to tons of new music. The constant interaction between musicians from different cultures and backgrounds, coupled with the nature of the job itself, results in the continual broadening of one's musical horizons.

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Ports.

This is the second of two posts designed to provide some information and insight into the ports so integral to the cruise ship industry; the previous entry dealt primarily with procedures for getting on and off the ship, and this entry will delve into the actual stops the ship makes during its run.

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Ports Procedure.

There are a great many aspects of life on a cruise ship that will be novel for most musicians. For this reason the upcoming posts will deviate from music-related themes in order to familiarize future shipboard musicians with concepts and routines that will quickly become normal and even second-nature once on board.

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Production Shows.

For anyone who has played a production show before, this entry could be quite boring (and for that, I apologize). However, it should be sufficiently interesting and informative for prospective orchestra musicians.

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Side Jobs.

As mentioned in previous blog posts, the large amount of free time musicians have on board can be spent in a myriad of ways. However, in addition to activities for one's own health, education or leisure, there are actually some ways to earn a bit of extra cash. Below are a few examples of side jobs where one can do exactly that, provided one is desirous of supplementing his or her base paycheck.

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